REAL OR FICTION

Is this what we are buying?

Is this what we are buying?

 

Truth: There is such a thing as Genetically Modified Organisms better known as GMOs.

As I am reading Michael R. Hick’s book Season of the Harvest, the first in his Harvest Trilogy, I am becoming aware for the first time about GMOs. I do admit to living in my own cocoon and being unaware of many things. But, this book has me wondering, how many GMOs do I purchase? Are they labeled as such? Are they harmful or beneficial? How many ways could they kill off a human population? Such as the thoughts of a paranoid person, or are they thoughts of someone who is intelligent to want to know. Well, I want to know. The story so far sounds very plausible to me and I wonder just how much of the story is real. I’d love Mr. Hicks to do an interview for us some time to tell us about his research and how he really feels on this subject. Anyhow, I hit the internet to do some digging for us and here is what I’m learning. After reading this post, I hope you will let me know your feelings about GMOs and what your plan of action is regarding your feelings. Also, if you have any new information on the subject, please share with us.

 

gmo tomatoes

 

The first site I went to is the Non-GMO Project.org’s website. There is a wealth of information here. At the website I learned that most developed nations do not consider GMOs to be safe. In more than 60 countries around the world, including Australia, Japan, and all of the countries in the European Union, there are significant restrictions or outright bans on the production and sale of GMOs. In the U.S., the government has approved GMOs based on studies conducted by the same corporations that created them and profit from their sale.

The article goes on to say that even though polls consistently show that a significant majority of Americans want to know if the food they’re purchasing contains GMOs, the powerful biotech lobby has succeeded in keeping this information from the public.


The Non-GMO Project is a non-profit organization with a mission of protecting the non-GMO food supply and giving consumers an informed choice. Their strategy is to empower consumers to make change through the marketplace. If people stop buying GMOs, companies will stop using them and farmers will stop growing them.


In the U.S., GMOs are in as much as 80% of conventional processed food. 
Click here for a current list of GMO risk crops according to the Non-GMO Project.

(The above information came from http://www.nongmoproject.org/learn-more/ )

This reads very much like Mr. Hick’s book. So, on to more information. The National Library of Medicine’s website says that the following are potential benefits of genetically engineered foods:

  • More nutritious food

  • Tastier food

  • Disease- and drought-resistant plants that require fewer environmental resources (water, fertilizer, etc.)

  • Decreased use of pesticides

  • Increased supply of food with reduced cost and longer shelf life

  • Faster growing plants and animals

  • Food with more desirable traits, such as potatoes that absorb less fat when fried

  • Medicinal foods that could be used as vaccines or other medications

and that the potential risks are:

  • Modified plants or animals may have genetic changes that are unexpected and harmful.

  • Modified organisms may interbreed with natural organisms and out-compete them, leading to extinction of the original organism or to other unpredictable environmental effects.

  • Plants may be less resistant to some pests and more susceptible to others.

The site goes on to inform us that “The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates production and labeling of genetically engineered foods, but that some people have raised concerns that the genes from one food that are inserted into another food may cause an allergic reaction. For instance, if peanut genes are in tomatoes, could someone with a peanut allergy react to tomatoes?”

(The above information can be found at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002432.htm )

Reading through the National Library of Medicine’s list, right away I see a conundrum – under befits they list decreased use of pesticides, but then they say that plants may be less resistant to some pests and more susceptible to others. Wouldn’t this lead to those dreaded super-resistant pests? Sounds like danger brewing to me. So, OK, we now have new allergies and super-resistant pests to worry about, no biggie, right? Let’s dig some more.

gmo farm

The Scientific American’s website says that

The bulk of the science on GM safety points in one direction. Take it from David Zilberman, a U.C. Berkeley agricultural and environmental economist and one of the few researchers considered credible by both agricultural chemical companies and their critics. He argues that the benefits of GM crops greatly outweigh the health risks, which so far remain theoretical. The use of GM crops “has lowered the price of food,” Zilberman says. “It has increased farmer safety by allowing them to use less pesticide. It has raised the output of corn, cotton and soy by 20 to 30 percent, allowing some people to survive who would not have without it. If it were more widely adopted around the world, the price [of food] would go lower, and fewer people would die of hunger.”

All of these are great points. It makes the debate sounds like the debate of drugs vs. their side effects. Put into that context it sounds normal and like there’s no problem. However, drugs list their side effects. So far I have seen no such labeling on our food. Have you?

The article further goes on to tell us , “The human race has been selectively breeding crops, thus altering plants’ genomes, for millennia. Ordinary wheat has long been strictly a human-engineered plant; it could not exist outside of farms, because its seeds do not scatter. For some 60 years scientists have been using “mutagenic” techniques to scramble the DNA of plants with radiation and chemicals, creating strains of wheat, rice, peanuts and pears that have become agricultural mainstays. The practice has inspired little objection from scientists or the public and has caused no known health problems.

The difference is that selective breeding or mutagenic techniques tend to result in large swaths of genes being swapped or altered. GM technology, in contrast, enables scientists to insert into a plant’s genome a single gene (or a few of them) from another species of plant or even from a bacterium, virus or animal. Supporters argue that this precision makes the technology much less likely to produce surprises. Most plant molecular biologists also say that in the highly unlikely case that an unexpected health threat emerged from a new GM plant, scientists would quickly identify and eliminate it. “

(http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-truth-about-genetically-modified-food/ )

My question is, “Why take the risk?” I can see the desire for better food crops though and how else would we get them if not for GM? The article goes on for many pages, but I opted to stop here for now. To sum up…on one hand we have these delicious, beautiful, plentiful new varieties of our favorite foods. Who can complain, right? On the other hand these beauties can cause our bodies and our DNA havoc. It could even possibly wipe out the human race as we now know it through mutation and the law of survival of the fittest. Is that a good thing or a bad thing? Can we improve the human race or will we create Frankenstein type of monsters? I don’t think I’ll live long enough to know, but I worry about my grandchildren and great-grandchildren, etc. So to ignore this question is immoral, I think. Also, I worry that some ego-maniacal fanatic will get it in their head to take control of matters and genetically alter the food chain to wipe out vast sections of humanity. The new warfare.

What should we do?  Can I give up those pretty purple string beans I’ve been looking for?  What about all the different colored bell peppers and beets?  It is worth thinking about.

 

creamy fried confetti corn

Home Cookin Chapter: VEGETABLES

 

Creamy Fried Confetti Corn

==========================

One of our most popular corn side dishes, this corn casserole does

not disappoint. The sprinkle of bacon cuts the creamy richness of

the dish, making it easy for this casserole to pair with just

about anything.

 

Yield: Makes 6 to 8 servings

 

Source: Recipe from Southern Living via

http://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/creamy-fried-confetti-corn

 

 

Ingredients

 

 

8 bacon slices, chopped

4 cups fresh sweet corn kernels (about 8 ears)

1 medium-size white onion, chopped

1/3 cup chopped red bell pepper

1/3 cup chopped green bell pepper

1 (8-ounce) package cream cheese, cubed

1/2 cup half-and-half

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon pepper

 

.

Preparation

 

Cook chopped bacon in a large skillet until crisp; remove bacon,

and drain on paper towels, reserving 2 tablespoons drippings in

skillet. Set bacon aside.

 

Sauté corn, onion, and bell peppers in hot drippings in skillet

over medium-high heat 6 minutes or until tender. Add cream cheese

and half-and-half, stirring until cream cheese melts. Stir in

sugar, salt, and pepper. Top with bacon.

 

Note: JULY 2002 My Notes

 

 

Servings: 0

 

Exported from Home Cookin 8.59 (www.mountainsoftware.com)

 

 

051100038-01-corn-fritters-recipe_xlg

 

Home Cookin Chapter: VEGETABLES

 

Fresh Corn Fritters

===================

Yields about 26 bite-size fritters.

 

“Make the menu: A Southern Fourth of July BBQ

By Maryellen Driscoll from Fine Cooking

Issue 100

 

Try these as an appetizer, served with Charred Tomato Salsa, as a

side with grilled chicken or fish, or for breakfast with maple

syrup.”

 

Ingredients:

 

All-purpose flour cornmeal baking powder granulated sugar table

salt whole milk sour cream eggs

Sweet corn vegetable oil

4-1/2 oz. (1 cup) all-purpose flour

1/4 cup stone-ground yellow cornmeal

2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. sugar

1/2 tsp. table salt; more for sprinkling

1/2 cup whole milk

1/4 cup sour cream

2 large eggs

1 cup fresh corn kernels (from about 1 large or 2 small ears of

corn), coarsely chopped

1 to 1-1/2 cups vegetable oil

1 recipe Charred Tomato Salsa (optional)

 

.

In a medium bowl, stir the flour, cornmeal, baking powder, sugar,

and salt. In a small bowl, whisk the milk, sour cream, and eggs.

With a rubber spatula, gently stir the egg mixture into the flour

mixture until just blended. Stir in the corn. Let sit for 10 to 15

minutes.

 

Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the

oven to 200°F.

 

Pour the oil into a small, heavy frying pan, preferably cast iron,

to a depth of 1/2 inch. Heat over medium heat until it’s hot

enough that a small dollop of batter sizzles when added.

 

With a spring-lever miniature ice cream scoop or a tablespoon,

scoop up a ball of the batter and gently release it into the hot

oil. Add three or four more balls of batter to the hot oil, taking

care not to crowd the pan.

 

Reduce the heat to medium low so that the fritters cook gently.

When golden brown on the bottom and barely cooked around the top

edge, after 1 to 2 minutes, use a slotted spatula to turn the

fritters and cook until golden on the bottom, 1 to 2 minutes

longer.

 

Transfer the fritters to a wire rack set over a baking sheet,

sprinkle generously with salt, and keep warm in the oven. Continue

to cook the remaining batter in small batches, adding more oil as

needed to maintain the 1/2-inch depth. Serve right away with the

salsa.

 

nutrition information (per serving): Calories (kcal): 70; Fat (g):

fat g 4; Fat Calories (kcal): 35; Saturated Fat (g): sat fat g 1;

Protein (g): protein g 2; Monounsaturated Fat (g): 1.5;

Carbohydrates (g): carbs g 7; Polyunsaturated Fat (g): 1; Sodium

(mg): sodium mg 120; Cholesterol (mg): cholesterol mg 20; Fiber

(g): fiber g 1;

 

PHOTO: SCOTT PHILLIPS

 

Read more:

http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/fresh-corn-fritters.aspx#ixzz3O

OSrVQIM Follow us: @finecooking on Twitter | FineCooking on

Facebook

 

Servings: 0

 

Exported from Home Cookin 8.59 (www.mountainsoftware.com)

 

 

corn-hoe-cakes-2-399x602

 

Home Cookin Chapter: BLINTZES, CREPES, PANCAKES, ETC.

 

Southern Hoecakes

=================

PREP TIME: 10 mins

COOK TIME: 15 mins

TOTAL TIME: 25 mins

 

“Southern Hoecakes make a great, simple side dish. Get this

family-favorite recipe for Southern

Hoecakes.”

 

Serves: 8

 

INGREDIENTS:

 

1 cup flour, self-rising

1 cup buttermilk cornmeal, self-rising

1 cup fresh corn, cut off the cob

Pinch of salt

Pinch of pepper

1 tablespoon sugar

4 tablespoons butter, melted

1 cup buttermilk

1 egg

Butter for griddle

 

.

INSTRUCTIONS:

 

Mix together all ingredients except the butter for the griddle.

Place butter on the griddle over a low medium heat. Scoop hoecake

batter onto griddle as you would pancakes. Cook until lightly

browned on one side and then flip. Cook on second side until

lightly browned and then remove to a serving platter.

 

source: http://addapinch.com/cooking/southern-hoecakes-recipe/

 

 

Servings: 0

 

Exported from Home Cookin 8.59 (www.mountainsoftware.com)

 

 

MARILYN’S CORN PANCAKES

My recipe for corn pancakes is very easy.

1 Box of Bisquick Baking Mix or your favorite pancake mix plus the ingredients to make 1 recipe of pancakes that the package calls for

1/4-1/2 cup canned or frozen Corn (I prefer the canned for this recipe)

Drain the corn. Mix the rest of the ingredients together and after they are mixed, fold in corn. Fry as per instructions on your mix. When golden brown on both sides, serve with coconut syrup if you can find it. I love coconut syrup with this recipe. I don’t know why, but I do. Here is a recipe for the syrup if you can’t find it in the stores. I have not had these with the coconut syrup since Uncle John’s Pancake House closed down in Rochester about 40+ years ago. I still think they had the best pancakes ever! I have never made the recipe below but it sounds interesting. Of course, you could try adding some coconut milk to maple syrup and bringing it to a boil and see what that comes out like. Let me know. Or if I try it, I’ll let you know.

 

Coconut Syrup

  • 1 stick butter
  • 3/4 cup buttermilk (or add 1 Tbs. vinegar to 3/4 cup milk)
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. coconut extract

In a saucepan, melt the butter, sugar and buttermilk together.  Stir frequently.  Bring it to a boil and boil for 1 minute.  Remove from heat and add the soda and extract.  It will bubble up a bit, but just stir until the fizz goes down.

http://eatathomecooks.com/2010/02/coconut-syrup-with-chocolate-chip-pancakes-and-chocolate-chip-waffles.html

 

CREDIT WHERE CREDIT IS DUE:

GMO graphic –http://sustainablepulse.com/2014/10/22/worlds-largest-ever-international-gmo-safety-study-set-london-launch/#.VLFnqIcTHEY

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AN APOLOGY

Writing the Anti-Superbowl Fun blog for the past two days wore me out. I don’t know why it was so draining, but it was. So today I find myself brain dead. I have no ideas on what to write today, so I’m taking the day off. My apologies. I hope that later I will find inspiration so I will have a great post for you tomorrow. Meanwhile, please stay warm, stay happy and healthy and stay tuned. I leave you with a new recipe or two though.

 

 

banana-pecan pancakes

Home Cookin Chapter: BLINTZES, CREPES, PANCAKES, ETC.

Banana- Pecan Pancakes

======================

Yield: Ten to twelve 5-inch pancakes

Prep Time: 10 min

Cook Time: 12 min

Ingredients:

1 large egg

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 cup buttermilk

1 cup mashed ripe banana (about 2 medium)

2 tablespoons packed brown sugar

2 tablespoons vegetable or canola oil

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup chopped pecans, toasted (optional- but so good!)

.

Directions:

1. In a medium bowl, beat the egg with a whisk until it’s a little

fluffy. Whisk in all of the remaining ingredients, except for the

pecans, and mix until smooth.

2. Heat a large skillet or griddle to medium heat. Spray with

nonstick spray.

3. For each pancake, scoop 1/4 to 1/3 cup batter onto the heated

surface. Cook pancakes until puffed and dry around the edges. Turn

and cook other sides until golden brown.

Source: RecipeGirl.com (adapted from Betty Crocker’s Cookbook:

Bridal Edition) via

http://kickassrecipes.tk/banana-pecan-pancakes/

Servings: 0

Exported from Home Cookin 8.59 (www.mountainsoftware.com)

 

 

gingerbread-waffles-recipe_17081

Home Cookin Chapter: BREAKFAST AND BRUNCH RECIPES

Gingerbread Waffles

===================

Prep 8 min

Cook 10 min

Ready 18 min

Gingerbread Waffles

Ingredients:

3 cup all-purpose flour

4 tsp baking powder

2 tsp ground cinnamon

2 tsp ground ginger

1/2 tsp nutmeg, freshly grated, eyeball it

1/2 tsp salt

4 large egg

2/3 cup dark brown sugar, packed

1 cup canned pumpkin puree

1 1/4 cup milk

1/2 cup molasses

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted, plus some to grease the waffle

iron

1 syrup, whipped cream, or fresh fruits for topping, to pass at

the table

.

Directions:

Preheat a waffle iron.

In a large bowl, combine flour, baking powder, cinnamon, ginger,

nutmeg, and salt.

In a medium bowl, beat eggs and brown sugar until fluffy, then

beat in pumpkin, milk, molasses, and melted butter.

Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients until just

moist. Do not over stir the waffle batter.

Brush the waffle iron with a little melted butter and cook 4

waffles, 4 sections each.

Serve with toppings of choice.

source: http://www.kitchme.com/recipes/gingerbread-waffles

Servings: 4

Exported from Home Cookin 8.59 (www.mountainsoftware.com)